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Australia wins: 10 beatiful Oz Libraries and the best new one in the world

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National UK news

International

  • 10 beautiful Australian libraries – in pictures – Guardian (Australia). Some lovely buildings [with my favourite being the one with the magnetic shapes children can put on the walls - Ed.]
  • Public library engagement in the United States – Pew Research Internet Project (USA). Very information 39 slide presentation: “An overview of three years of research into Americans’ relationships with public libraries in the digital age.”
  • The best new public library of the year is Australian – Kulturstyrelsen (Australia). “The building functions with high quality in an inviting, informal and human scale. With its open and flexible spaces, the library is transformed into a democratic space, inviting diversity and interaction. The library is an important new facility for the rapidly expanding community within the City of Hume. In addition to library services, the building also interacts with different partners, including an art gallery, a café, childcare facilities, computer training centres, and meeting and functional spaces. It is integrated so that the library can reach out to a wide array of users. “
  • With Schools Closed, Teachers and Volunteers Hold Class at Ferguson Library - Daily River Front Times (USA). “At 9 a.m. Tuesday morning, a couple of Walnut Grove teachers and other volunteers stood outside the Ferguson Public Library, a few blocks north of the Ferguson Police Department, waving signs that read “Teachers Here to Teach” and “Students Welcome.”” … “About 30 kids filtered in and out by midafternoon, and Pace expected more to come before the teachers and volunteers left at 4 p.m. They’ll be at the library again today from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m., but Pace is uncertain about Thursday and Friday. The staff is required to attend a professional development session that will address crisis-management counseling on those days.”

UK local news by authority

  • Birmingham – Temporary closure of Children’s Library and Music Library during September – Library of Birmingham. “The Children’s and Music Libraries will be closed from 8 to 19 September 2014 inclusive. This is to enable remedial work and resurfacing of the yellow floor to finish it to an acceptable standard. With any new building, there are always things that need further attention after construction, and the Library of Birmingham is no exception. Please bear with us while this essential work is carried out and please accept our apologies for any inconvenience caused.
  • Hull – Give your views on the future of library Services – Hull City Council. “Hull City Council will today (Wednesday August 20) start consultation about the future of the library service.  Residents, visitors and library users have until Tuesday September 30 to take part in the consultation and provide feedback that will help to make important decisions and shape the future library service across the city.  The consultation will ask questions about the range of services on offer at the libraries, user’s satisfaction with the services and the opening hours of each site.”
  • Hull – Hull’s library service public consultation starts – BBC. “Liberal Democrat councillor Adam Williams said: “Last year they threatened to close Anlaby Park Library, u-turning when they realised the level of public outrage. “Earlier this year, they said they would not close any fixed libraries in the city, but then last month announced they were considering closing Holderness Road Library. Now they are saying they want to reduce the hours of libraries across the city. “In my view, reducing the hours that libraries are open is just a precursor to closing them.”

“Even before work started on Liverpool’s fancy £55m Central Library, funded by a private finance initiative deal, the Eye warned that annual repayments for the PFI scheme would threaten the ordinary branch libraries visited by most library users. Now the city has identified 11 out of 18 branches to face the chop or be handed over to community groups in an attempt to find £2.5m savings.  Announcing the plans, Liverpool mayor Joe Anderson explicitly said the PFI payments have to be made from the library budget, so other library services must be cut. Those earmarked for closure include Sefton Park library, even though it is identified in a city council report as “good performing”, since potential interest has been shown in its listed building.  Another library in Wavertree is said to be of interest to a housing association; and “some form of library offer” might be kept if that deal went ahead.  That offer is unlikely to include a room for playing Xbox360 games and a cafe full of “scrumptious cakes” available to those with access to the fancy Central Library, but nor is it likely to be a properly staffed and stocked public library either.” Private Eye Issue No. 1373 Library News

  • Newcastle – Campaigners celebrating after High Heaton Library is saved from closure - Chronicle. “Book lovers are celebrating after winning their fight to keep a much loved community library open. High Heaton Library in Newcastle was facing closure after council cuts to the library service in 2012 put it under threat. However Newcastle College has come to the rescue by deciding to run some of its classes for students from the building, meaning that the library service can stay open for local residents.” … “The library building has been acquired by Newcastle College on a three year lease. Courses in literacy, numeracy and IT will be run on five half-days a week and while the classes are going on for students, people can access the full set of library services with a council librarian on hand.”
  • Swansea – Runaway ferret makes a surprise visit to Swansea Central Library – South Wales Evening Post. “Workers had a shock when they spotted a runaway ferret scampering between the bookshelves. The four-legged mammal darted through the main entrance at about 2pm on Sunday afternoon before vanishing amongst the books.”
  • Worcestershire – Hagley Parish Council steps in to save library – Stourbridge News. “An agreement has been reached whereby the county council will continue to provide a library service through the support of volunteers while the parish council takes over the responsibility for the building and the premises management costs involved. ” … “We had a public meeting about the library and over 150 people turned up. That’s how much it means to people. Proposals to turn the building into a community hub were given a resounding yes.”

“Apart from being vomited on, the job is not without its challenges”

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City of Philistines, Ditching Dewey and Grumpy Librarians.

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The main news story over the last few days have been the cuts to Liverpool’s libraries.  Alan Gibbons calls it changing Liverpool from the City of Culture to the City of Philistines.  Other news includes several novel ideas, with the one that first caught my eye being Google Street View – something which has been bubbling around for a little while now. The other idea is forgetting Dewey (how dare I! The blasphemy of turning one’s back on an American from a century ago!) and modelling the bookshelves around the user not the stock.  This has been credited with a doubling of usage in the Netherlands but that will have little push with librarians elsewhere – after all, this is inertia we’re talking about.  Heck, we’d have to relabel the spines of our books.  The danger is that on this subject we’re like the grumpy librarians in this article who blame the users for messing up the stock, when the whole purpose of the stock is the user.

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Librarians of the Year

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It’s great to see public librarians being recognised for their exceptional service.  Well done to those who received the awards and for all those others who were nominated.  This is the first year that the awards have taken place and I hope that this becomes a firm tradition, with benefits including improving the standing of the winners in their communities and also for the profession as a whole.

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Carnegie UK Trust says: Get Your Innovation On

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Carnegie UK Trust have been having a good month or two.  They recently produced the excellent “Speaking Volumes” advocacy tool and now they have announced more details of a £200,000 library innovation fund that intends to “future-proof public libraries”, develop innovative ideas and, by the by, encourage innovation and leadership skills amongst library staff. In these days of traditional funding cuts, a mass (often forced) emigration from the profession and an increased questioning of the library role by those who hold the purse strings, this is to be strongly welcomed.  The challenge for those applying - and for the Trust itself – is not be distracted by glamorous but irrelevant ideas but ones which may make a real difference to the UK public library service.  Don’t get distracted by the shiny, people.  Think about things which have potential for the long term.  We, literally, can’t afford not to.

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Liverpool sinking, stock floating … and a request for information

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The big news is that the Liverpool Mayor’s recommendation to the Council is that the city loses more than of its libraries. People are not impressed and, to be fair, neither is the mayor – he says that due to Austerity programme, he had no choice and that “We’ve tried to come up with a proposal that obviously everyone’s going to hate.  It’s not something that we feel, you know, people are going to welcome”.  Well, no one has welcomed it yet and no one is likely to.  It may also be that not all of the problem is down to the Government spending programmes, although a lot of it undoubtedly is. The cut may also have at least something to do with the £50 million spent on refurbishing Liverpool Central Library, notably the high interest rates inevitably attached to such a PFI scheme.  It’s a beautiful Central Library alright.  However, only 40% of those consulted say that they will use it if their local branch closes so it’s beauty may be lost on the local people of Liverpool.

In these times of tighter budgets, we should be looking at all ways of reducing spending.  One of the ideas I’ve seen raised from time to time is the idea of dynamic or floating stock, where stock has no “home” branch as such.  Such a system can save on transport and staff time but I’ve seen no real research done on the system in practice.  I’ve put together a brief description, pros and cons and a case study on a new page here if you’re interested.

I have been asked if I know of any requests for interventions in library cuts made to the DCMS/Secretary of State. We already know about the requests in Brent, Isle of Wight, Lewisham, Gloucestershire, Somerset, Doncaster and Bolton but would be very interested to hear of any more.  Thank you.

Please email ianlibrarian@live.co.uk with news, comments, ideas or queries. Thank you.

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Access to Research: 20% of libraries fail to take up free resource. Why?

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I was surprised to hear that after a full six months, the free online “Access to Research” resource has not yet been taken up by one in five of library services.  Why? It’s free, after all. At the time of the launch, I had reservations about the scheme but concluded that a starving man should take any crumb: well, it seems that a significant minority of libraries won’t.  On the face of it, it’s a no-brainer: it offers ten million academic articles at minimum hassle (you sign up – that’s it) and it’s free.  Mind you, it’s only be used by a pitiful 14,500 individual users in its first six months so it’s obviously not that good despite the positive spin being put to it.  14,500?  Many individual town libraries see more users than that in a month.  So, what’s going on? Well, it’s not been heavily publicised. Don’t get me wrong – it’s been given as much publicity as anything else but there’s just not enough money in public libraries for it to make an impact.  Also, it’s only available, weirdly, by physically visiting a branch rather than via a computer at home.  Some even think it’s a ploy by publishers in order to deny further access.

Other reasons for what appears to be a low take-up rate may be that it is, by the nature of the beast, not a popular tool but one for academics only.  It’s also just a pilot and, times being as they are, many authorities may be concentrating on more pressing things (like keeping the doors open) than an online academic resource.  I understand the Society of Chief Librarians will be reminding the last fifth of what they’re missing as well so that will partly make up for the low-level (because it’s a free service, there is no money) publicity behind the launch in the first place.  In addition, the Publisher’s Licensing Society (PLS), the organisation behind Access, does have some resources (posters, FAQ booklets, desktop icons, microsite etc) to further  things along.

Well, whatever the reason for the (what to me at least) appears to be low take-up so far, public libraries are going to lose the resource after two years if it is not a success.  As Joanna Waters from the PLS has told me: “A final point to note is that this is a pilot, and if after two years the service is deemed as not fulfilling its criteria by stakeholders it will be reviewed as to whether we should continue to offer the service. It would be a shame obviously, as it could be a useful way to extend access to academic materials, for free, to those who would otherwise find it difficult to get hold of them, and of course it is currently another free service to add to the library offering.”.  So, does your library service offer Access? If not, make enquiries as to why not.  It may be they simply missed it.  If they do offer it then make sure that it is being promoted.  If the library services has taken it up, promoted it but it’s not working so well, is it because the service is not good enough - and, if so, how can it be improved? Let’s tell them. Because heaven knows public libraries need all the help they can get, and it’d be a shame if we fail to take the free opportunity up with both hands.

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  • Business loyalty card for library customers and community shops - Aldeburgh Library, Suffolk.

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Downwardly mobile?

Editorial

Mobile libraries are not having a good time of it at the moment: my records show Bromley’s decision to close it’s sole vehicle is the eighth mobile library gone since April: while only two static libraries have gone the same way.  One of the reasons of course is that it’s one thing to get volunteers to run a static library but a whole other thing for them to maintain a vehicle, find drivers and pay the insurances.  Mind you, of course, perhaps Bromley is missing a trick as there may be money in mobiles: Cambridgeshire certainly hope so as they have started offering advertising on them. That advertising idea is just one of seven I’ve spotted for this post: the large number due to a SCL report on digital skills that includes some interesting case studies.

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Things to do in Kilmarnock, and in your library, before you die

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Last week I was mostly in Scotland doing geocaching - including a nice one in the grounds of the Dick Institute library in Kilmarnock by the way – so you’re getting a whole week’s news in one (well, not quite all – there’ll be more catch-up at the next post). There’s the usual depressing news from England (sorry, don’t blame me, blame the Austerity) but also some interesting news from other places, including from a very successful Dutch library that shows doing things differently (and having some investment) can make a huge difference. By the way, do please nominate your favourite library for the “1001 libraries to see before you die” project at IFLA.  My favourite has to be Liverpool Central Library for the reasons I explore here, what’s yours?

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New Milton Keynes Library under construction in Kingston retail park

The deepest cut in UK public library history? Kirklees goes (almost) all out

Editorial

Kirklees is the latest authority to announce the large scale cuts to library services of a scale far greater than the current libraries minister, Ed Vaizey, thundered in disgust about when he was in opposition. Indeed, in terms of numbers of branches under threat as a proportion of total branches, this is the deepest proposed cut so far announced, almost certainly in peacetime UK history.  Granted, the Isle of Wight, back in 2011, suggested closing all but two of its libraries but it only had 11 to begin with, while Kirklees appears to have over 20. The proposed budget cut is over 50%:  truly gigantic, but my sources tell me, even this may not be the lowest announced over the next couple of years. Kirklees frames its proposals around the now-familiar offer to the community – that is, volunteer or your library will close – and, interestingly, they mention the  earlier takeover of one of their libraries, Denby Dale, by a community group (which includes an ex President of CILIP as one of their number).  However, my guess is that they’ve been keen on cutting libraries there for years – my first reference is in the first year of the Coalition - and so such cuts would have happened anyway.  It’s austerity that is the killer here, not volunteers.

Other news this week can be seen as the same story as Kirklees but with different local flavours.  Hull are deeply cutting opening hours by almost a third, with a few volunteers and a move to a Trust thrown in.  This is especially sad to me as I remember a phone call with their councillor that was then responsible for libraries a few years ago who told me how great libraries were and how he’d never cut them. Time have changed.  Sheffield, further along the line in its cut cycle than Kirklees, has announced all libraries will stay open, but with at least ten being run by the unpaid with limited council support.

Right, to balance out this depressingness, let’s get two positive stories in.  The first is the Welsh public libraries report which looks very useful and promotes the essentialness of the service in local communities.  Secondly, Birmingham have been given a substantial amount of money from the Wolfson Foundation for promoting their libraries to young people.  iPads, ebook readers, projectors and 3D printers are mentioned … I hope they will also do music and Minecraft as well.

Moving away from the public sector but in a move that has already been seized upon by at Forbes - who should know better – as suggesting that public libraries can be cut still further, Amazon have announced a lending scheme for some of its books.  Initial looks at it I have seen suggest there’s a few, a very few, famous titles in there and hundreds of thousands of titles few would want to read. Crucially, Amazon’s new off does not appear to offer a community atmosphere in a local building, someone who knows you, neutral expertise, study space, personal computers, printed books, a photocopier, newspapers, storytime, reading groups, display space or coffee.

Finally, you may have noticed that this is the first Public Libraries News post for a week. This was due to illness. The next one is also due in a week but this is for a happier reason: I’m off on holiday.  In the meantime, and despite everything, keep being awesome my friends.

Do you have any comment or news?  Then please send to ianlibrarian@live.co.uk.  Thank you. Positive news stories and library ideas warmly welcomed.

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